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Discussion Starter #1
Used LS1 Pistons....for a budget build.

I want to get some input from you guys. Would you use a set of OEM GM Cast Used pistons for a budget build that will always be NON Turbo/SuperCharger and never on a racetrack with that engine? The pistons come with rods (pressed pin). I have rods but i can always sell of a set of used rods....if there is a market for them.

Why -- Why not ?

$100(used) vs. $300(new) Both Cast.
 

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guess it depends on what used means.. Are we talking 20K on a stock engine used or 40 year old crack whore with 6 kids used?

even on the 20 K ones I would have them dye penetrant tested at a local machine/speed shop (at your cost) and make them passing part of the deal.
 

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just ask to have them magnafluxed and dye tested first. If they also mic out good, then why not?
 

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Of course you can magnaflux non-magnetic materials, you just gotta use the right magnets













































:nuts: gotcha good ****er!
no you cannot magnaflux non-magnetic metals.
 

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Yes you can Mag Non ferrous metals we do it all the time.

I work on aircraft what they do is induce a magnitic field to the metal before testing and after knocking the mag out the same way if not it sounds crazy use a hammer to knock the rest the way out.

I rather X ray them my self.




Of course you can magnaflux non-magnetic materials, you just gotta use the right magnets













































:nuts: gotcha good ****er!
no you cannot magnaflux non-magnetic metals.
 

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Used LS1 Pistons....for a budget build.

I want to get some input from you guys. Would you use a set of OEM GM Cast Used pistons for a budget build that will always be NON Turbo/SuperCharger and never on a racetrack with that engine? The pistons come with rods (pressed pin). I have rods but i can always sell of a set of used rods....if there is a market for them.

Why -- Why not ?

$100(used) vs. $300(new) Both Cast.
For me, it would depend on on many miles were on them and how they mic'd out. It would also depend on what the block mic'd out that I was going to use.
Saving a little money on pistons will go right out the window if the rods need to be rebuilt. You will pay to have the pistons pressed off and then reinstalled, hoping they don't screw up the pistons trying to remove them.

Definitely use new rings and clean the ring lands very well.

If they are $300 new, I probably wouldn't pay over about $50 used. I wouldn't even go used unless I was broke and needed the car to earn more money.
 

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the second you start an engine the first time your running USED PISTONS...its the condition,they are in, clearances and application that matters.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Im still on the fence. Seems people are pretty proud of their used LS1 pistons. (std nonetheless).
Ive read that one main issue is the cast pistons getting stress risers as the pin is pressed out and put back in. So this could be an issue.
Im not sure i want to gamble with all that for to save $200 or less.
 

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Im still on the fence. Seems people are pretty proud of their used LS1 pistons. (std nonetheless).
Ive read that one main issue is the cast pistons getting stress risers as the pin is pressed out and put back in. So this could be an issue.
Im not sure i want to gamble with all that for to save $200 or less.
When a pressed pin is installed, they put the little end of the rod on a heater device that heats it to specific heat range so it expands slightly. With the piston sitting is a little cradle, they put the rod in position and insert the pin. The pin slides in easily since the hole in the rod has expanded. Once the rod cools, the hole tightens up and the pin will not move. This takes seconds because the pin draws the heat out.

To remove the pins, you don't have the luxury of being able to heat the small end of the rod up so it allows the pin to slide out. You have to press it out.
The piston is what is supporting the pressing operation.
Depending on how many miles are on the pistons, they can develop a varnish around the end of the pins that needs to be cleaned off or it will score the aluminum while the pin is being pressed out.
 
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